Montessori Discipline

Montessori Discipline

Montessori Discipline

A Montessori approach to discipline consists of a proper balance between freedom and discipline. Like any part of Montessori education, Discipline must come through liberty we do not consider or individual disciplined only when he has been rendered as artifically silent as a mute and as immovable as a paralytic he is an individual arrihilshed not disciplined.

 (Montessori, 1967) In a Montessori classroom, children who are allowed to develop their own self-control attain liberty through the ability to “rid themselves of those many disorderly and unconscious tendencies that necessarily place [them] under the strict and continuous control of adults.

 Montessori is a method of education that is based on self-directed activity, hands-on learning and collaborative play. In Montessori classrooms children make creative choices in their learning, while the classroom and the highly trained teacher offer age-appropriate activities to guide the process.

  1. Know school guidelines for discipline procedures.
  2. Be fair, positive and consistent. …
  3. Provide a list of standards and consequences to parents and students. …
  4. Keep your classroom orderly. …
  5. Get to know your students. …
  6. Let the students know you care. …
  7. Treat students with the same respect you expect from them; keep confidences.
Discipline is the inner awareness and control over one’s reconciliation between one’s own needs and the environment’s needs. Without discipline, a person is ultimately unable to do what he wants. As such, freedom and discipline are considered two sides of the same coin.
 
  • Children Are Shown Respect. Respect is the foundation of the Montessori Method. …
  • Kids Have Absorbent Minds. The young mind is ready and eager to learn. …
  • Sensitive Periods Are Critical For Learning. …
  • Kids Learn Best in a Prepared Environment. …
  • Kids Can Teach Themselves Through Autoeducation.
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